Teaching Guide

Please refer to the module Teaching Guide for additional information.

Lesson summary
Instructional use
Pre-lesson activity
Standards covered by this lesson
Selected bibliography
Assessment

Lesson summary


This lesson familiarizes students with the main groups of the periodic table: alkali metals, alkali earth metals, transition metals, other metals, nonmetals, and noble gases. The lesson narrator is hydrogen, the first element. Hydrogen and the noble gases serve as "judge and jury" while the groups make their case as to why they should be the first in the Periodic Table of Elements. The first element from each group describes the property of its group and common uses to persuade readers that they are more important than the other groups. Throughout the lesson, students are asked to write their opinions about whether the different groups made a strong enough case to deserve getting a new position on the table. The lesson includes access to an Interactive Periodic Table of Elements for students to engage in hands-on exploration of the periodic table.

Instructional use


This lesson includes multiple voices and would be an excellent choice for involving students in reading aloud as different characters. Use a projector to display the lesson to the classroom and have students take turns reading different parts, such as hydrogen, lithium, boron, etc.

For other instructional use scenarios refer to the module Teaching Guide.

Pre-lesson activity

It is recommended that teachers preview the lesson to identify concepts that may need to be reviewed before students begin. Teachers may also wish to create a vocabulary/spelling list for terms found in this lesson.

The Periodic Table of Elements consists of rows, called periods, and columns, called groups. Students may benefit from a review of how to read tables by columns and rows.

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Standards covered by this lesson

Refer to the module Teaching Guide for list a Language Arts goals covered by all WebDocent lessons.

Grades 7-8 Science

Illinois State Goal 11

Have a working knowledge of the processes of scientific inquiry and technological design to investigate questions, conduct experiments, and solve problems.

Illinois State Goal 12

Have a working knowledge of the fundamental concepts and principles of the life, physical, and earth/space sciences and their connections.

Selected bibliography

Albert Stwerka, A Guide to the Elements, rev. ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Patricia L. Barnes-Svarney, The New York Public Library Science Desk Reference. New York: The Stonesong Press Inc. and The New York Public Library, 1995.

Assessment

Refer to the module Teaching Guide for an explanation of the online journal for assessment purposes.

See the Additional Activities page for ideas for extending the lesson offline.

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